Gentrification

I have lived in my current town for the past 37 years. The town was established after the civil war as a tourist destination, people would come from Texas in the summer to escape the heat in those days before air conditioning. Lots of other people came as medical tourists, to breathe the fresh mountain air that would hopefully cure their tuberculosis. This was the gateway to gold mines, there was ranching and some farming, but tourist have always been important to the economy. So people have noticed that this is a rather nice place to live, and thus, the old is being removed and the new is taking its place.

This shed-like building is down by the railroad tracks. One can see it from the freeway (motorway), and so it has a mural celebrating the wonders of the town. The previous mural was a disaster, it started peeling and looking rather shabby almost as soon as it was finished.

Up close it is not much to look at, but this corner is slated to become a whiskey-tasting room. I suspect that the purveyors of said whiskey will not be encouraging visits from the many homeless people who roam the area.

I suppose that tha graffiti “art” that adorns the building marks it out as a hipster sort of place, but the roof on this side of the building shows it’s origin as a a shed.

This is the bit that is used by P, he rebuilds bicycles and gives them to homeless people. He also takes donations of stuff, and will find people who can use these donations. (I was down there dropping things off when I took these pictures).

The things that I find incredible about the proposed gentrification of this building are that it is in a strange location (under an overpass), and there are no water lines or heating. The building was originally used for grain storage when there was farming nearby, it’s just a giant shed by the railroad tracks. But, money will be poured into the structure, while keeping the rustic, bohemian nature of the building, and tourists will come (whether we like it or not).

Hot Dog

I still read the daily newspaper (delivered to my home by mysterious means early each morning). And I was excited to read that the Oscar Mayer Weinermobile was in town. I caught a glimpse of it when I was driving along downtown, but I had an appointment, and couldn’t quite catch up with it. But all was not lost, there it was at the supermarket the next day.

Of course I have seen the previous versions driving down the road in years past, but this was my chance to get up close and personal with one. To see what it was actually made of (custom fiberglass body on a truck chassis). Yes, I do want one.

And here it is, a giant driveable hot dog, perhaps leading the way to the future with its spaceship-like design. It had a pair of drivers who were handing out discount coupons and swag (like the postcard).

This is just one of the many (six) Weinermobiles and it came all the way from Wisconsin.

I don’t care what hot dogs are actually made of, they’re delicious (in moderation).

But not everyone loves them. I guess there is no pleasing some pterodactyls.