Ordinary food

I did challenge myself to see if the food I make really looks that bad, so I made everything from the last post.

Here’s my version of a taco salad, lettuce, beans, meat, green onion (I did put in some avocado because the previous one had some), avocado, tomato, tortilla chips, and cheese.   The dressing is salsa and mayo.   It’s an easy recipe and one can add or subtract ingredients to use up whatever is at hand.

Here’s my version of corn soup, it’s rather bland looking in comparison to the restaurant one, but mine has bacon in it, so it wins the contest.  Ingredients are corn, potato, onions, broth and bacon, so the recipe is simple and delicious.

The taco is being propped up by the kitchen shears, which were close at hand.   I don’t have a fancy holder for tacos, but the tacos are okay if a little lopsided.   Meat. salsa, lettuce, tomato and lots of cheese in a commercially made shell.   (Not as tasty as the restaurant ones) 🙁

The stuffed Poblano  pepper does not look nearly as nice as the restaurant version, but both were equally delicious.  Mine has a meat, onion, green chili and bread stuffing, and is disguised in a green chili sauce and plenty of cheese.

Ultimately, I like both kinds of creations:  in restaurant food they need it to look nice (and hopefully taste nice) so that one feels that the food is worth the money, but home cooking means that food is prepared exactly to one’s own preference, and that is a good thing too.

 

 

Beautiful Food

Back when photos required film, I really doubt if many food pictures were taken by ordinary photographers.   Film required that one’s picture be in focus, with correct lighting and then there was the expense and the waiting period for it to be developed, before finding out if the picture was a success.  But with a digital phone it is super easy to take multiple pictures at no cost (other than the cost of having a phone).   Thus there has been a giant boom in both selfies and food pictures.

This is the most ordinary of dishes, a taco salad.   I assure you that one’s I make for myself do not look this beautiful.

Corn soup with heart-shaped chili oil at a fancy restaurant.   Corn soup is a very traditional Native thing.   I often make it from the recipe I got handed down from my grandmother on the Rez    This version was so delicious that I was quite tempted to lick the bowl.

This is also a new taken on an ordinary item, roasted vegetable tacos on freshly made corn tortillas, something I would never make.

I do make stuffed Poblano peppers, but they never look like this (mine are covered in green chili sauce and cheese).   Once again it is the beautiful sauces (tomato and red chili) that made it memorable.

I speculate that part of why we take pictures of food is to remember it (perhaps even in the hope of re-creating it), and the other part is to make our social media friends jealous.  🙂  I hope this worked.

Training

I hate to drive long distances (over four hours away), so after I got to Santa Fe, there was the question of how to get back.   I could take a plane ($$$) to Denver, and then take the shuttle home.   Or I could take the train and see if I still liked it as a way to travel.   I hadn’t taken a train in America in years (at least 35), but I had taken trains in Europe, so I decided to give it a go.

The first issue:  the train doesn’t actually go to Santa Fe (because of the grade), so it was off to Lamy, NM.

The train creeps along a similar, but slightly different path than the interstate (motorway).   I wondered who had lived in these adobe ruins, and how long ago that was.

This ruin was the Casteneda Hotel, built by Fred Harvey to draw tourists to the southwest.  It hasn’t been in use for years, but someone with deep pockets is renovating the place in the hope of attracting rich tourists  (who like to ride the train) again.

The train does feature this lovely observation car so that one can watch the scenery as it goes by.   No photos, but I did see wild turkeys, buffalo, deer, antelope and elk as we rolled along.

This is M’s uncle’s place, and I know that I have posted pictures from the house looking towards the tracks.  That’s Santa Clara mesa in the background.

And I know I have posted lots of pictures of the mound, too bad that it was an overcast day this time.   And you can see that it is dry as a bone there.

The beautiful high plains of New Mexico, with Capulin in the distance.  I never get tired of this view, although I am usually looking at it from the other direction as I come over Raton Pass.   Yes it was definitely a great idea to ride the train this time.

Still more art

There is a certain pleasure in unchanging exhibits at art museums.   It is quite lovely to visit with one’s favorite pieces of art.  When I was a youngster I loved to visit Hosukai’s Great Wave  in it’s hidden corner of the big art museum.  And I thought it was was both beautiful and enigmatic (and a lovely shade of blue).

But there is also something to be said for changing exhibits, especially in a smaller museum, like our local museum.  One never knows what sort of things might be on display:  like these bits of art from Haiti.

I have no idea what this means and all the artistic blather that inspired this piece, I thought it looked interesting (and it was covered in glitter, which is always a good thing).

I do love surrealist art as well.

I had wondered what to do with my collection of tiny plastic figures, here was the answer staring me in the face.

Why not?

Sometimes one has to just surrender to the art.